Do vs Play Collocations: How to Choose the Right Word

#collocations

Do vs Play Collocations: How to Choose the Right Word

Do vs Play Collocations: How to Choose the Right Word As you should know by now that different types of athletes have different titles. Someone who does judo is very different from someone who does baseball or someone who runs. Sometimes as an ESL student, you can easily fall into the trap of labeling every athlete a player. My new students do it a lot!They’ll maybe ask me, “do you play boxing?” I always retort quickly,”you don’t play boxing”; “boxing is a violent sport”: “you don’t play violent sports.” Because, in the Japanese language, everything is “shimasu” or play.sports-related. So, like I mentioned before, you’ll get questions from students, like, “do you play boxing/kendo/karate” and Even questions like “do you play ski/swimming/running.” I then have to go to my sports lesson. Gotta bust out my sports flashcards with the verbs written on top of each sports card, so they can quickly read and absorb the information. It takes some time to get them acclimated and into a routine of using different verbs for different sports. But, if they are serious,and want to learn, they make sure they absorb the information. So, as usual… Let’s Dive In #collocations #commoncollocations

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How to Use the word Challenge – 和製英語

Today, we’ll be focusing on the word… Challenge
English, unlike Japanese, when borrowing a word from the Japanese language tends to keep the original meaning of the word being borrowed.
E.g., typhoon, kimono, tycoon
The meanings of those words don’t change, at all…
However, the opposite isn’t true
When a word in the English language is borrowed and used in Japan
You’ll find the meaning is jaw-droopingly different…
First, the word in English gets katakanized, thus losing it’s original sound…
And, then if it’s not totally skewed in terms of sound, it then takes on A totally different meaning than it’s original meaning
Thus after it’s re: washing and reconfiguration it becomes
WASEI-EIGO
Words or phrases like :
MY PACE (マイペース)
meaning: to do something at one’s own pace

or
COST DOWN (コストダウン)
meaning: to ask someone in a retail store to drop the price, or give you discount

So, those are just a few examples of how words in the English language become corrupted when it’s borrowed and used in the Japanese langauge.

Today, we’ll be focusing on the word… Challenge

Must vs Have to – Modals

Both must and have to express obligation or necessity, but there are some small differences: Especially, true, also, is that most native English speakers use have to over must because of the cultural understanding of the difference in the meaning of the two. Meaning, in certain situations, and within context, they have very different usage and meaning Must express the speaker’s feelings, even about subject matters, whereas have to express, above all, a general rule or idea Ex: You must think I’m stupid if you think I’m going to pay for that junk.  The speaker feels/thinks he/she is being taken advantage of. (I think that you think I’m stupid) Find Me at : Instagram: instagram.com/americanenglishinternational Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aki.brandley/ AmScEn : https://americanschoolofenglish.info/ Make an Appointment and check for updates: https://theamericanschoolofenglishint…

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Related Posts

How to Use the word Challenge – 和製英語

How to Use the word Challenge – 和製英語

Today, we’ll be focusing on the word… Challenge
English, unlike Japanese, when borrowing a word from the Japanese language tends to keep the original meaning of the word being borrowed.
E.g., typhoon, kimono, tycoon
The meanings of those words don’t change, at all…
However, the opposite isn’t true
When a word in the English language is borrowed and used in Japan
You’ll find the meaning is jaw-droopingly different…
First, the word in English gets katakanized, thus losing it’s original sound…
And, then if it’s not totally skewed in terms of sound, it then takes on A totally different meaning than it’s original meaning
Thus after it’s re: washing and reconfiguration it becomes
WASEI-EIGO
Words or phrases like :
MY PACE (マイペース)
meaning: to do something at one’s own pace

or
COST DOWN (コストダウン)
meaning: to ask someone in a retail store to drop the price, or give you discount

So, those are just a few examples of how words in the English language become corrupted when it’s borrowed and used in the Japanese langauge.

Today, we’ll be focusing on the word… Challenge

Must vs Have to – Modals

Must vs Have to – Modals

Both must and have to express obligation or necessity, but there are some small differences: Especially, true, also, is that most native English speakers use have to over must because of the cultural understanding of the difference in the meaning of the two. Meaning, in certain situations, and within context, they have very different usage and meaning Must express the speaker’s feelings, even about subject matters, whereas have to express, above all, a general rule or idea Ex: You must think I’m stupid if you think I’m going to pay for that junk.  The speaker feels/thinks he/she is being taken advantage of. (I think that you think I’m stupid) Find Me at : Instagram: instagram.com/americanenglishinternational Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aki.brandley/ AmScEn : https://americanschoolofenglish.info/ Make an Appointment and check for updates: https://theamericanschoolofenglishint…

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