How to Use the word Challenge – 和製英語

How to Use the word Challenge – 和製英語

Today, we’ll be focusing on the word… Challenge
English, unlike Japanese, when borrowing a word from the Japanese language tends to keep the original meaning of the word being borrowed.
E.g., typhoon, kimono, tycoon
The meanings of those words don’t change, at all…
However, the opposite isn’t true
When a word in the English language is borrowed and used in Japan
You’ll find the meaning is jaw-droopingly different…
First, the word in English gets katakanized, thus losing it’s original sound…
And, then if it’s not totally skewed in terms of sound, it then takes on A totally different meaning than it’s original meaning
Thus after it’s re: washing and reconfiguration it becomes
WASEI-EIGO
Words or phrases like :
MY PACE (マイペース)
meaning: to do something at one’s own pace

or
COST DOWN (コストダウン)
meaning: to ask someone in a retail store to drop the price, or give you discount

So, those are just a few examples of how words in the English language become corrupted when it’s borrowed and used in the Japanese langauge.

Today, we’ll be focusing on the word… Challenge

Must vs Have to – Modals

Must vs Have to – Modals

Both must and have to express obligation or necessity, but there are some small differences: Especially, true, also, is that most native English speakers use have to over must because of the cultural understanding of the difference in the meaning of the two. Meaning, in certain situations, and within context, they have very different usage and meaning Must express the speaker’s feelings, even about subject matters, whereas have to express, above all, a general rule or idea Ex: You must think I’m stupid if you think I’m going to pay for that junk.  The speaker feels/thinks he/she is being taken advantage of. (I think that you think I’m stupid) Find Me at : Instagram: instagram.com/americanenglishinternational Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aki.brandley/ AmScEn : https://americanschoolofenglish.info/ Make an Appointment and check for updates: https://theamericanschoolofenglishint…

Lake – Sunrise – Water – Trees – Relaxing Morning Ambience

Lake – Sunrise – Water – Trees – Relaxing Morning Ambience

#lake #sunrise #trees #water Relaxing Ambience A video made for just about any early morning occasion! Whether it’s getting a bit of breakfast, getting ready for work, or riding the train. This 30-minute video will set you up for your work day, workout, or relaxing time. Gear up, and get ready and relax to the singing of birds; the ambient sounds of insects–cool and soothing sounds of an early morning sunrise. Special Thanks to: @SIMPLE CREATIONS by Joe Hackney Music by PatrizioYoga from Pixabay Music by NaturesEye from Pixabay Musik von Amurich auf Pixabay Musik von NaturesEye auf Pixabay Musik von Stock_Studio auf Pixabay Equipment Used : iMac – https://amzn.to/3NL9fRs Magic Mouse – https://amzn.to/3NHYvmP Magic Keyboard – https://amzn.to/3NHBDnB

OU Grapheme – American English

OU Grapheme – American English

The“OU” Grapheme The 10 Different Pronunciations of “ou” Today, we’re gonna, not only take a look at but learn … What makes learning English so hard And, this is only one aspect of what makes learning English so hard… Inconsistency will be our keyword for this lesson The dichotomy is pronunciation and spelling The dichotomy between English spelling and pronunciation is different Mastering English requires abilities that most children don’t develop until they’re pre-teens. And, that is a fact for natives, so, it’s 10x as hard for ESL and EFL students Don’t let these “show you in one YouTube lesson“ videos fool you In order to really think, spell or build your confidence in speaking English, you’re gonna have to live in an English-speaking country for at least a year or two. With language, there is a HUGE cultural string attached to understanding it Americans tend to be consistent across the board socially, but unfortunately, the spelling and pronunciation are inconsistent So, keep this in mind:There are exceptions in the[e] English language and English is chock full of exceptions and inconsistencies And, sometimes, English doesn’t follow a logical pattern So, just keep that in mind for this lesson And, with that being said… Let’s Dive In #english

Speaking Practice – Connected Speech

Speaking Practice – Connected Speech

Speaking practice in English using connected speech. Speaking and listening. This video is to get ESL speakers acclimated to connected speech in English. Since ESL speakers can’t go around asking every native English speaker to “please speak more slowly[sic]” That’s just not natural. ESL speakers, especially adults are just going to have to learn the language and listen a bit faster.

Do vs Play Collocations: How to Choose the Right Word

Do vs Play Collocations: How to Choose the Right Word

Do vs Play Collocations: How to Choose the Right Word As you should know by now that different types of athletes have different titles. Someone who does judo is very different from someone who does baseball or someone who runs. Sometimes as an ESL student, you can easily fall into the trap of labeling every athlete a player. My new students do it a lot!They’ll maybe ask me, “do you play boxing?” I always retort quickly,”you don’t play boxing”; “boxing is a violent sport”: “you don’t play violent sports.” Because, in the Japanese language, everything is “shimasu” or play.sports-related. So, like I mentioned before, you’ll get questions from students, like, “do you play boxing/kendo/karate” and Even questions like “do you play ski/swimming/running.” I then have to go to my sports lesson. Gotta bust out my sports flashcards with the verbs written on top of each sports card, so they can quickly read and absorb the information. It takes some time to get them acclimated and into a routine of using different verbs for different sports. But, if they are serious,and want to learn, they make sure they absorb the information. So, as usual… Let’s Dive In #collocations #commoncollocations

Which vs That – What’s The Difference?

Which vs That – What’s The Difference?

That vs. Which Brought to you by The American School of English, International Located in Kashihara, Nara, Japan Let’s Dive Right In! If you’re confused about that vs. which don’t fret. It’s one of the most common topics people are curious about. Here’s the deal! The word “that” is used when you’re talking about a specific thing. Cars that have big engines are fast! If we remove “that,” the meaning of the sentence completely changes. “Which” is used to add information to a sentence. Cars, which have big engines, are fast. If you leave out the part of the sentence with which the meaning of the sentence won’t change. Cars are fast. that -used with restrictive clauses which=used with non-restrictive clauses. (rc)The car that is blue is hers. (nrc)The car, which is blue, is hers. (nrc)The car is hers. If we remove the which clause the meaning of the sentence doesn’t change. Which clauses need commas *, , That clauses don’t need commas You’ll often see British writers using either which or that not depending on whether the clause is essential or nonessential but simply because they feel like it. And, if you’re an American working in the Japanese school system, which goes by an American English standard, you’ll notice that textbooks here use the British way of using which and that! And, that is because they choose the path of least resistance, the easiest path. Appointment: https://americanschoolofenglish.info/ https://theamericanschoolofenglishint… Phone : 0744213505 Follow Me at : Instagram: instagram.com/americanenglishinternational Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aki.brandley/ AmScEn : https://americanschoolofenglish.info/ Appointment: https://theamericanschoolofenglishint…

18 Examples of Words Derived From Proper Nouns

18 Examples of Words Derived From Proper Nouns

Correction *”native to the Mediterranean region with other cabbage species, Brussels sprouts first appeared in northern Europe during the 5th century, later being cultivated in the 13th century near Brussels, Belgium, from which they derived their name.”
These are 18 words derived from proper nouns but are used with nonliteral meanings. These words derived from proper nouns have a generic usage. They all have nonliteral meanings which makes them lowercase. The argument against capitals, which can be found in The Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.). “Personal, national, or geographical names, and words derived from such names, are often lowercased when used with a nonliteral meaning.” Note that the manual emphasizes the word “nonliteral.” The style guide acknowledges that while it prefers to lowercase proper names “in their nonliteral use,” some such names “are capitalized in Webster’s.” Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.), like the online Merriam-Webster Unabridged, has these words in uppercase. The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (5th ed.) has half and half. The New York Times, too. As for me. I’m going with the Chicago Manual of Style. 1.arabic numerals 2. brussels sprouts 3. champagne 4. cheddar 5. dutch oven 6. frankfurter 7. french dressing 8. french fries 9. french window 10.india ink 11. manila envelope 12. morocco leather 13. pasteurize 14. roman numerals 15. scotch tape 16. swiss cheese 17.venetian blinds 18.weiner Follow Me at : Instagram: instagram.com/americanenglishinternational Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aki.brandley/ AmScEn : https://americanschoolofenglish.info/ Make an Appointment and check for updates: https://theamericanschoolofenglishint… #chicagomanual #styleguide #propernoun #esl #americanenglish #accenttraining #trainingvideo #sounds #speakfatser #fluent #english #relaxedpronunciation #connectedspeech #esl #masteringtheamericanaccent #theamericanaccent

The Easiest Way to Practice Speaking Quickly – Phrases

11 Common Everyday Phrases
Speaking Practice

1. Mornin’
(good morning)
2. Hey, what’s up?
Hey, what’s hap-nin’(happening)?
(hello)
4. Hey, what’s goin’ down, man?
(hello)
5. Hey, how’s everything going, bro?
(hello)
6. Nah,I think I’ll just stay home today.
(no-not in the mood)
7. Don’t feel like going out, man.
(no-not in the mood)
8. Lemme get some eggs, man.
(I’d like some eggs)
9. I got a little work to do.
(I’m a bit busy)
10. You gonna call’er?
(Are you going to give her a call?)
11. Yeah, right!!
(I don’t believe you—you’re lying)